In the Classroom: Human Development 101

In the Classroom: Human Development 101

So much rides on one piece of paper. A resumé, instructor Nigeria Bell told her Human Development 101 students, “demonstrates who each of us is,” so it’s important to emphasize the qualities and skills that make you the best fit for a potential job. Now, Bell asked the class, who likes writing resumés? (One yes. One maybe.) “I’ll be honest,” Bell said. “I don’t like writing them either.” But with a focus on four key components—format, job-specific information, other relevant content, and accurate spelling and grammar—a resumé can represent the applicant and catch the eye of an employer. And so the 14 students in this Monday’s Human Development class began the tasks of identifying necessary facts and details, comparing resumés and coming up with words and phrases for their own. That’s one of the goals of Human Development 101—a class designed to provide students the skills to navigate both college and career. The quarter-long class covers stress management and test-taking strategies, along with setting job goals and writing resumés. The resumé, Bell explained, is part of a culminating project—an action plan for college. “We want students to identify the career they’re hoping to achieve and build a road map to the future,” she said. For the resumé-writing assignment, some students already had a document to update, while others were about to draft their first one. Students broke into groups to brainstorm the essential categories of information. Joshua Keely brought his resumé to share with his group. Classmates Judy Rudolph and Eric Bass noticed how Keely separated the text into “qualifications,” “work experience,” “education” and “references.” “I had a fair...