Student Film “All American High School Film Festival” Official Selection

Student Film “All American High School Film Festival” Official Selection

The short film “Being Evel,” created by Claire Gostin, Payton Whatley, Kiante Parker and Fiona McLennan for a Tacoma Community College Gig Harbor Film Production Class, has travelled far beyond the classroom. The story of a girl inspired by the daring feats of Evel Knievel premiered at the Gig Harbor Student Film Showcase in the fall of 2014. In the spring of 2015 it was shown at Tacoma’s Grand Cinema as a TCC Diversity Film Festival selection. Now it’s been chosen as an Official Selection by the All American High School Film Festival, Oct. 9-11 in New York City. Gostin plans to attend the festival, which has multiple workshops, screenings, and professional development opportunities to choose from. Whatley and McLennan may go too. “What a cool accomplishment for first-time filmmakers!” said Film Production Instructor Phil Wilson. “As a teacher I don’t think I’ve ever received better news.” The production partnership that made “Being Evel” also outlasted the class. The team plans to start filming a documentary soon. Being Evel from Fiona McLennan on...
TCC Flocks to Wayzgoose

TCC Flocks to Wayzgoose

Only print makers would hold a celebration that has a ‘z’ right smack dab in the middle of the title. Wayzgoose. In its 11th year, Tacoma’s Wayzgoose is a community event focused on highlighting the arts, books, and above all, printmaking. Derived from a centuries old tradition of printers celebrating together, Tacoma takes it to 11 by introducing a steamroller to the printing process and proudly carries the tradition forward. The Process 1. Concept development 2. Layout in Photoshop 3. Transfer to linoleum 4. Inking the image 5. Carving 6. Apply ink 7. Apply pressure via steamroller Before we get to the steamrollers, let’s look at how TCC fits into this. Twenty-fifteen marks the first time TCC has participated in Wayzgoose and what a participation it was. Katie Anderson, Samantha Plastino, and Anna Grafing, led by TCC art instructor Marit Berg, worked on the project from start to steamrolled finish. As (hopefully) everyone knows by now, this year is the 50th anniversary of TCC and the TCC Wayzgoose team wanted the print to connect with the history of TCC. The group brainstormed events, images, and pop culture from 1965 to present and eventually the group was able to narrow it down to some key images and iconography that represented TCC and the decades of its existence. “The two symbols that caused the most discussion were the anarchy symbol and the Napster logo. Nobody knew what the Napster logo was, but it makes the connection to colleges, music, and the changing technology.” The process for creating the TCC print took over a month and involved computers, carving tools and an...
Printing in 3D

Printing in 3D

Building 5 and Building 15 aren’t very similar. Building 5 was built decades ago and Building 15 opened in 2007. Building 5 is home to our Art department and 15 houses our Science and Engineering departments. While the architectural similarities may be few and far between, the buildings at the very ends of the TCC campus do share one thing: 3D printing. United by piece of technology that only just recently came into feasibility due the continued falling cost of consumer grade machines, the Art and Science departments are working with modern technology to advance education. 3D printing is additive manufacturing. The machines at TCC take spools of plastic and melt the plastic, layer by layer, until an object is created. While our 3D printers can’t print off copies of objects as fast as a paper printer (an object an inch or two in size can take an hour or more), this technology is drastically changing how science and art are explored at TCC. Engineering professor Eric Basham is planning on using 3D printing as a major component to his Spring 2015 Engineering 104 class. After dividing his class into teams, each team will be given a motor and a solar panel and their challenge will be to design and build a working water pump. Across the world, moving water as efficiently as possible is a major problem and the students will use 3D printing to develop rapid-prototypes of their water pumps. “3D printing has changed how we can build prototypes. Previously you’d have to have machine it out of metal. You’d either have to have that expertise or...
Una Voce: New Website

Una Voce: New Website

Una Voce has been a physical publication for many years, but the time has come to bring it into the digital world. A dedicated website will be launching shortly. There, you’ll find the current and past issues, as well as other information about submitting work, and selected student work. “It’s time to expand the world of Una Voce beyond the physical magazine,” says Mary Fox, TCC Faculty Advisor to Una Voce. By moving to an online presence in addition to the printed magazine, Una Voce will be able to highlight more student work and provide another angle to the publication. The Una Voce project is driven by students and having a website will enable to them to get valuable experience in digital publication. Christopher Arthur of Push Eject Design, a TCC and Una Voce supporter, provided the initial website design. Look for the website to launch...