Megaphone Comes Home

Megaphone Comes Home

Alumnus Norman Bellamy came to TCC in the early 70’s for the same reasons a lot of his fellow Mt. Tahoma grads did: a. it was cheap and b. he wasn’t sure what he wanted to study. “Back in our time, I think it cost us less than $40 per class,” said Bellamy, who came from a single-parent home where money was tight. “And the first two years of college is pretty basic anyway. TCC was the perfect environment to get some college under my belt, and by the time I got to UPS I knew exactly what I wanted to do.” With a job as well as a full class load, Bellamy would have been a typical “get in, get out” transfer student, with little time or inclination to hang around campus. “And there was no place to hang around besides the cafeteria anyway,” said Bellamy. But his friend Roger – last name unremembered – needed a second “Yell King” for the cheer squad. “I said, sure, I’ve got a big mouth,” said Bellamy. And just like that, he became a TCC cheerleader. “It was nothing fancy. We didn’t throw any women in the air like they do nowadays,” said Bellamy. “I think it was six women and two guys.” The squad had just one team to cheer for: TCC’s outstanding men’s basketball team. When the team went on the road, the cheer squad would occasionally hop a ride on the team bus, though mostly they’d follow along in a car. But even the biggest mouth would have had some trouble making itself heard in the earsplitting racket...
Human of TCC: Dale Coleman

Human of TCC: Dale Coleman

“For the first couple weeks I was just holding my breath. It wasn’t until I started to get feedback from people who had lived through some of this stuff that I felt like I could relax or celebrate. When someone like Ron Magden or Chris Young tells you that your story rang true, or that they learned something new about the College, that’s when the hooray moment hits. And it really is a wonderful feeling.” Dale recently finished a book about the history of Tacoma Community...
Alumni: Dr. Shawn Nelson Schmitt

Alumni: Dr. Shawn Nelson Schmitt

by Rachel Payne This article first appeared in the TCC Magazine At the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland, Dr. Shawn Nelson Schmitt examines patients’ cognitive functions. Some of them have experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI). Others have progressive memory loss caused by diseases like Alzheimer’s. Some have psychiatric symptoms. It’s work he finds fascinating and personally fulfilling. Pathway to a Ph.D. Though academic achievement has always come easily to Dr. Nelson Schmitt, a straightforward path to a scientific career was never assured. He grew up in a single-parent household with limited resources, and English was his second language. His first was American Sign Language (ASL). “My mother was an Alaskan Native who moved to Washington to attend the Washington State School for the Deaf in Vancouver, WA. She was the only Deaf child of twelve siblings.” Dr. Nelson Schmitt came up through Tacoma’s Eastside public schools. “I enrolled in the Running Start program at TCC because I wanted more of an academic challenge. Additionally, I did not fit in well with most of my classmates in high school, so I felt that I would benefit from a different environment. I was particularly drawn to TCC because the student population was so diverse.” In Running Start, Nelson Schmitt found a challenging academic atmosphere – and a mentor who believed he was up to the challenge. “I attribute much of my perseverance to your encouraging words and rigorous academic standards,” he wrote to Running Start Advisor Christy Perotti, who is included in the acknowledgements section of his dissertation. It’s possible for a motivated Running Start student...