TCC’s Salmon

TCC’s Salmon

The salmon tank was first established in November 2013 after TCC dismantled the 600 gallon marine aquarium due to multiple structural issues (of most concern was the bowing of the plexiglass sides, an omen of catastrophic failure!) In the place of the marine aquarium, TCC partnered with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Salmon Cooperative program and Puget Creek Restoration Society to raise coho salmon and release them into Puget Creek. The first batch of eyed coho salmon eggs (250 of them, to be precise) was picked up on December 2nd, 2013 from Voight Creek Hatchery in Orting. TCC released those salmon into Puget Creek during Earth Week on April 24th, 2014. TCC picked up the second batch of 250 eyed coho eggs from the same hatchery exactly one year after the first batch. Those eggs had all hatched by December 11, 2014 and started swimming and eating solid food during the week between Christmas and New Year’s. Between hatching and “swimming up” they hang out on the bottom of the tank in the dark, absorbing the yolk in their yolk sac for nutrition. Once the yolk is gone they are light enough to swim and they can come out from under the black felt we use to darken the tank and simulate their early natural habitat: living under the gravel in a stream bed. When the eggs have hatched they are called alevin. Once they “swim up,” they are called fry. Professor Shaun Henderson’s Biology 100 classes are monitoring the water quality in the tank as well as the development of the salmon. “The students are most excited about having a direct role in helping return...
Printing in 3D

Printing in 3D

Building 5 and Building 15 aren’t very similar. Building 5 was built decades ago and Building 15 opened in 2007. Building 5 is home to our Art department and 15 houses our Science and Engineering departments. While the architectural similarities may be few and far between, the buildings at the very ends of the TCC campus do share one thing: 3D printing. United by piece of technology that only just recently came into feasibility due the continued falling cost of consumer grade machines, the Art and Science departments are working with modern technology to advance education. 3D printing is additive manufacturing. The machines at TCC take spools of plastic and melt the plastic, layer by layer, until an object is created. While our 3D printers can’t print off copies of objects as fast as a paper printer (an object an inch or two in size can take an hour or more), this technology is drastically changing how science and art are explored at TCC. Engineering professor Eric Basham is planning on using 3D printing as a major component to his Spring 2015 Engineering 104 class. After dividing his class into teams, each team will be given a motor and a solar panel and their challenge will be to design and build a working water pump. Across the world, moving water as efficiently as possible is a major problem and the students will use 3D printing to develop rapid-prototypes of their water pumps. “3D printing has changed how we can build prototypes. Previously you’d have to have machine it out of metal. You’d either have to have that expertise or...
Champions of Sustainability

Champions of Sustainability

We’ve been recognized by McKinstry as a Champion of Sustainability. This award is given to organizations that work towards energy innovation and waste reduction. TCC employs a variety of energy saving techniques. Building 15 has solar panels installed on the roof to provide electricity. The newly opened Harned Center for Health Careers uses 150 underground pipes to provide geothermal heating and cooling to the building. Less exciting, but just as important, are they ways computers are power managed or how the thermostats are set in buildings. We’re committed to a sustainable...